Spare the Air

A friend told me yesterday that our smoke-drift polluted skies are a normal daily experience in much of China. I cannot imagine. Or rather, I am too horrified to imagine. Even for these few days that we’ve been experiencing the smoke drift from the Napa and Sonoma fires, and even with my Buddhist-learned knowledge that everything is impermanent, including fires, I am struggling with accepting the fact that this is how the air is right now. How people can live in this kind of air day after day is beyond me. The very thought feels unbearable and sad.

Two days ago, as the fires raged through Napa and Sonoma and our air down here thickened with smoke (all of this is still happening), Scott Pruitt, our president’s appointee to the EPA, signed a measure to repeal the Clean Power Act. This is the end to the “war on coal,” he announced.

Among others, the war on coal is waged by the Sierra Club’s Beyond Coal Campaign. According to their website, since 2010, over 260 coal plants have been retired, with about 260 left to go. Coal is considered the dirtiest energy source our country uses, raising the smog (ozone) levels which lead to unhealthy air and filling both sky and earth with toxic mercury and soot particles. The so-designated “war on coal” is really a battle to keep our air clean and our world — our habitat — safe for life.

We live in a world which, for all intents and purposes, is a closed system. We have only so much water, so much air, so much soil. Polluting our air and our water and the earth itself means we are forever damaging our habitat, forever damaging the resources we require for human life to continue — I am not talking about resources required for the newest cell phone or for yet another yacht or plane or even for a pair of underwear. I am talking about that which we depend on for survival. The human body can survive 4 weeks without food, about 4 days without water, 4 hours without shelter, and no more than 4 minutes without air.

The smoke from the fires in Napa and Sonoma Counties is released into our air and will now be circulating our earth. Sure, it will diffuse somewhat and not cause quite as much pollution per unit of air as it does right now, trapped inside our valley. But in general, it will stay in our air, the closed air system of our planet, at least until someone invents a big space vacuum cleaner that can collect pollution particles, bag them and carry them out of the earth’s gravitational pull. Until this happens, the good news is that there’s some things we’ve discovered that clean the air. Yes, you’ve read that right. There is something we can do — to a point — even after all this pollution is released into the air.

Research has shown that trees trap gases and pollutant particles in their leaves and bark. They absorb CO2 and release oxygen into the air. Trees can even cool the world with their shade and by releasing water vapors into the air. Great news for global warming! Wetlands, too, act as important filters to pollutants, trapping them in sediments and preventing them from entering our drinking water. The world, it turns out, is not entirely defenseless against us humans. But still, we need to give the Earth a break. We need to stop polluting and destroying and offer it a helping hand.

I have signed up recently for San Mateo County’s new Peninsula Green Energy to be my electricity provider. This group ensures that my electricity comes from 100% renewable and sustainable sources, guaranteeing 100% carbon-free emissions. I am also pursuing putting solar on my roof. Yes, I know I don’t really need it now, with this Peninsula Green Energy program, but with the new administration looming over my air and my water I want to make sure I can be independent and know from where my electricity comes with even more certainty.

You too can become a supporter of clean air, clean water, clean earth. Check out the Sierra Club’s website for more information on how to do this. http://content.sierraclub.org/coal/.

You can plant a tree in your home or even as far as Asia and Africa https://onetreeplanted.org/ or in Israel http://www.kkl-jnf.org/tourism-and-recreation/plant-a-tree-israel/.

You can commit to saving water, using less pesticide and fertilizers in your yard and choosing to buy organic, pesticide-free fruits and vegetables from local farmers. You can even buy more environmental cleaning agents for your home and your toiletries!

There are so many ways to support the earth — and ourselves by extension — that it would be impossible to list them all on one page!

Please consider doing something pro-Earth today and every day, as part of your regular life.

The light at sunset, on the Tahoe Rim Trail, at Twin Peaks.

Consider choosing clean water, soil and air.

, , , , ,

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Sigal Tzoore (650) 815-5109